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BIO

whatgrandmawore is a celebration of all-things fashion and its most iconic moments, written by Ruby-May Helms. She has a BA (Hons) in Fashion and Dress History, and an MA in the History of Design and Material Culture. She is currently in the process of applying for a PHD in design history, exploring the relationship between clothing and death. 

 

This blog explores fashion and dress history through the analysis of surviving garments and other material culture from museum collections. It discusses fashion theory, topical and current issues, and reviews the latest exhibitions. 

 

TO CONTACT: rubymayhelms@hotmail.com. 

 

You can follow us on our social media channels by searching for us on Instagram and Twitter.

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November 6, 2018

Jeanne Lanvin was a prolific French couturier who enjoyed several decades of success during the twentieth century. First training as a milliner during the late 19th century and subsequently opening her own business in 1889, Lanvin eventually joined the Chambre Syndicale de la Haute Couture in 1909.

She ran a highly successful fashion house for many years, her success only interrupted by invading Nazi’s who called for French couturiers to design under the occupation of the Third Reich, and relocate haute couture to Berlin during the Second World War. Lanvin refused, backing the President of the Chambre Syndicale, Lucien Lelong, supporting the livelihoods of innumerable ateliers and the heritage of France's fashion industry. Lanvin later died after the end of war in 1946, leaving behind France's oldest couture house still in operation today. 

Lanvin began making womenswear after clients expressed their admiration for the clothes Lanvin designed for children. In 18...

February 24, 2017

2009.300.3277. House of Worth Tea Gown. c1910. Silk, rhinestones and metal. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. 

The Edwardian era began with the death of Queen Victoria in 1901. With the death of the longest reigning monarch at the time, Britain was at first plunged into full mourning dress. However, after the black clothes subsided, and her eldest son Edward VII took the throne, the country was introduced to an era of opulence and extravagance.

The Edwardian era is often regarded as a period of elegance and graciousness (Wilson, Taylor: 1989. 43), whilst great social change occurred in regards to the conditions of the welfare state, and demands for the voting rights for women intensified. For the upper-class lady, couture fashions were increasingly lavish. In order to maintain appearances, she would require: a large fortune (it remained expensive to dress fashionably during Edwardian times), several outfit changes throughout the day, and a team of dedicated maids to help ini...

October 21, 2016

'Fashion consists only in extremes [...] frivolity and death.' 

'Does fashion die [...] because it can no longer keep up the tempo?' - Walter Benjamin - The Arcades Project.

The fashion system relies on a never-ending cycle of newness, spectacle, emulation and death. This is how fashion works - without the invention of new, or the recycling of previous styles, the fashion industry would not survive. 

Many theorists have tried to make sense of the fashion system. Thorstein Veblen believed that once commodities had been purchased, consumers would move on to the next trend, unsatisfied and desiring more goods which would elevate their social standing. Products, although not always functional, nor of the best quality, could be marketed in such a way that consumers would believe it was an exclusive status symbol. Exclusivity = a higher price.

Veblen also believed that the middle-classes imitated the fashions of the upper-classes. Once fashion had disseminated all the way down to the w...

July 14, 2016

During the Belle Epoque era, a young, feisty entrepreneur emerged. Her name was Lucile; and her mission was to create couture for a new kind of a woman. A British designer, Lucile was arguably the first female to receive international recognition for her sartorial creations.

C.I.47.57.1. Lucile dance dress. c1914. Silk, fur and metallic thread. Lucile. The Metropolitan Museum of Art Museum, New York. 

Entirely self-taught, Lucile became a dressmaker working from her home in Mayfair, London during the late 19th century. She was already divorced, with a young daughter, yet her business was a success and she opened a dressmaking salon during 1898, located at 17 Hanover Square. This was completely unheard of for a young single mother, yet Lucile was determined to let her business grow. 


T.35-1960. Lucile evening dress. c1912. Silk, chiffon, satin, and embroidered metallic thread. The Victoria and Albert Online Collections, London. 

After two years, Lucile remarried a baronet, becoming La...

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